Remembered Today: Squadron Leader Henry E. Maudslay, DFC (1921-1943)

Squadron Leader Henry E. Maudslay, DFC

Remember today is ‘Dam Buster’ Henry Eric Maudslay who lived at Foxhill Manor, Broadway. Henry who was born on 21st July 1921 in Lillington, Leamington Spa, Warwickshire. He was killed in action, aged 21, during a Dam Buster raid on 17th May 1943.

Henry was the son of the Reginald Maudslay, the founder of Standard Motor Company, Coventry, and Susan Gwendoline, née Herbert. Henry had an older brother, John born in 1912, and an older sister, Margaret Kate, born in 1910. During the late 1930s the family moved to Foxhill Manor, Broadway, where they continued to live until 1954. Henry’s father died suddenly in London after a short illness in 1943. His mother lived in Broadway, moving to Barn House, until her death in 1974.

After leaving Prep School in Gloucestershire, Henry attended Eton College (1935-1940) where he is remembered for his athletic and rowing accomplishments. He volunteered for the RAF in 1940 and trained as a pilot in Canada. In May 1941 he was assigned to 44 Squadron as a Hampden pilot. After 29 operations, he was recommended for the Distinguished Flying Cross and assigned to Lancaster training; he apparently did some test flying for Rolls Royce during this period and was later assigned to 44 Squadron’s training flight.

Whilst a member of the training flight he flew all three of the ‘Thousand Bomber Raids’. In January 1943 he started a new operational tour with 50 Squadron, with which he completed 13 operations before being assigned to 617 Squadron as B Flight commander.

Operation Chastise

On the night of 16th/17th May 1943, Henry and his crew took off from RAF Scampton (with Guy Gibson Dam Busters) in Lancaster ED937 Z, part of Operation Chastise to bomb the dams in the Ruhr area of Germany. Following successful bombing of the heavily defended Mohne Dam, they headed east and successfully bombed the Eder dam but the Upkeep (the Barnes Wallis bouncing bomb) seems to have either gone off prematurely or was dropped late and the explosion damaged their Lancaster. The aircraft limped towards home but was shot down by a German flak battery near the Dutch border in the town of Emmerich. All, the crew, including Squadron Leader Henry Maudslay, DFC, were killed.

The crew of Lancaster ED937 Z

Pilot S/L H E Maudslay DFC
Flight engineer Sgt J Marriott DFM
Navigator F/O R A Urquhart DFC RCAF
Wireless Op. W/O A P Cottam RCAF
Bomb-aimer P/O M J D Fuller
Front gunner F/O W J Tytherleigh DFC
Rear gunner Sgt N R Burrows

The crew are all buried in the Reichswald Forrest Cemetery, Germany,  and there is a bronze memorial plaque to Henry E. Maudslay in the church of All Saints’ Sherbourne Park near Warwick. Henry is also commemorated on the Willersey War Memorial, St Peter’s Churchyard, Willersey, Gloucestershire.

A blue plaque was unveiled in his memory on 27th July 2017 at his old home, 1 Vicarage Road, Lillington, in the presence of two of Henry Maudslay’s nieces, his great-niece and his great-great niece and two great-great-nephews.

 

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

 

Further reading:

Leamington History Group: http://leamingtonhistory.co.uk/henry-eric-maudslay-dfc-dam-buster-pilot

 

 

Remembered Today: Flight Sergeant (Wireless Operator/Air Gunner) 1583124 Sydney Joseph James

Sydney ‘Sidney’ Joseph James of Broadway (1924-1945)

Sydney J. James (1924-1945)

Sydney1 Joseph James was born in Broadway in 1924, the son of Joseph Charles James and Annie Elizabeth James (née Turner) of Mill Avenue, Broadway.

As a boy, Sidney was educated at Broadway Council School and a member of Broadway Scout Group. Sidney was a keen footballer and played for Broadway Football Club’s junior teams before later becoming Secretary of the Club. After leaving school Sidney went to work on the clerical staff at the corn merchants Titchmarsh and Hunt in the village.

Following the outbreak of the Second World War, Broadway set up a Pig Club and Sidney was appointed the first Secretary of the Club2. Sidney was interested in flying and was a member of Broadway’s Air Training Corps, playing football for Broadway’s ATC at weekends.

Aged 18, he joined the Royal Air Force in 1942 and he served with the 61 Squadron Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve as a Wireless Operator/Air Gunner on Lancaster Bombers.

Operation Leuna and the Loss of the Crew of Lancaster B3, LM720 QR-D

Sidney was killed whilst on operations during the early hours of 15th January 1945. On 14th January, He was one of the crew3 in Lancaster B3, LM720 QR-D, piloted by Flight Officer William George Corewyn,  that took off at 8.51pm from RAF Skellingthorpe, Lincoln, on a night time raid to bomb the synthetic oil refinery near Mersberg, Eastern Germany (Operation Leuna). The Lancaster successfully carried out the raid but crashed during the return flight over Norfolk. Poor weather conditions and possibly a garbled message advising the destination of Carnaby Airfield near Bridlington, Yorkshire, are thought to have contributed to the crash. However, the Lancaster headed towards Langham Airfield, Norfolk, and in the fog struck the 200ft RAF radar mast on Bard Hill, Salthouse. The Lancaster came down at 1.21am on Salthouse Heath near Langham Airfield. Six of the crew including Sidney died instantly and Air Bomber Flight Sergeant Edward ‘Teddy’ Boakes died in hospital later the same morning.

Remembering Sydney Joseph James

Sydney’s Headstone, St Eadburgha’s Churchyard, Broadway, Worcestershire

Sidney’s body was recovered from the crash site and brought back to Broadway. He was buried in St Eadburgha’s Churchyard the following week. His funeral service, attended by his family, friends and representatives from Broadway Parish Council, Titchmarsh and Hunt and Broadway’s ATC, was conducted by the Vicar of Broadway, Rev. V.H. Patrick. Sidney’s coffin was draped in the Union Flag and borne by Sergeant Sunley, Flight Sergeant Phillips and ATC Cadets Agg, Beard, Dyde and Print.

Sydney Joseph James is commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial and on the Roll of Honour inside St Michael and All Angels Church in the village.

 

We will remember them.

 

 

 

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

1. Also spelt ‘Sidney’. His first name was registered at birth as ‘Sydney’ but his RAF records have his name recorded as ‘Sidney’.
2. Broadway Pig Club, to supplement meat rations during the War years, was started in March 1941 following a meeting at the Lifford Memorial Hall attended by Worcestershire’s Agricultural Organiser, C. Culpin. The first officers of the Club were: A.B. Williams (Chairman), Charles Steward (Vice-Chairman), Sydney James (Honorary Secretary) and A.F. Lomas (Hon. Treasurer). A year later the Club had insured 130 pigs and there were over 160 members.
2. The crew of the Lancaster LM720 QR-D were: Flight Sergeant R.C. Battersby (Navigator), Flight Sergeant E.J. ‘Teddy’ Boakes (Air Bomber), Flight Officer W.G. Corewyn (Pilot), Sergeant J. Douglas (Air Gunner), Sergeant P.R. Earl (Flight Engineer) and Sergeant R. Richardson (Air Gunner). They were all in their 20s. The oldest was 24.

 

Further reading:
Air Crewed Remembered

Sources:
http://www.ancestry.co.uk
The records of International Bomber Command Centre, Lincoln.

Remembered Today: Two cousins Pte 15372 Albert H. Clarke, 11th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment and Pte 29206 George T. Handy 9th (Service) Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment

Albert Henry Clarke, was born in Broadway in 1893, the third son of Albert and Emma Mary Clarke. After leaving school, Albert worked for Thomas Bayliss, grocer, corn and offal dealer of Sheldon House, Broadway. Shortly after the outbreak of the First World War, Albert enlisted with Kitchener’s Army in Broadway in September 1914 and joined the Worcestershire Regiment. After a period of training on Salisbury Plain, Albert was posted to Gallipoli in June 1915. During his time in Gallipoli, Albert was injured by a kick from a horse and was transported back to England where he recuperated in a hospital in Stockport, Cheshire.

Albert later rejoined his regiment and in August 1916 was posted to the 11th (Service) Battalion in Salonika. The following year, during the night of 24th/25th April 1917, the Battle of Doiran, Albert, who had just turned 24, was killed in action. He is commemorated on the Doiran Memorial, Greece, and the Broadway War Memorial.

Two of Albert’s cousins also fought in Salonika. His cousin George Thomas Handy, known as Thomas, was born in Broadway in 1880. After leaving school Thomas was apprenticed as a baker and after his marriage to Clara Porter in 1901, moved to Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire, where he set up his own bakery and was greenkeeper at Moreton-in-Marsh Golf Club. Thomas enlisted with the 9th (Service) Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment and was also killed during the night of 24th April 1917 when he was hit by a shell. Thomas is buried in Karasouli Military Cemetery, Polykastro, and he is commemorated on the Moreton-in-Marsh War Memorial as ‘Thomas G. Handy’.

Cousin Wilson William Keyte was born in Broadway in 1885. Wilson enlisted with the Worcestershire Regiment and served with Albert with the 11th (Service) Battalion in Salonika. Wilson was awarded the Military Medal for stretcher-bearing duties during the Battle of Doiran and after the end of the war was awarded the Greek Military Cross. Wilson died, aged 64, in 1949.

 

Doiran Memorial, Greece (Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Doiran Memorial, Greece (Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

 

Albert is one of 48 commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial. Further information about Albert, his cousins and fellow men from Broadway commemorated on the memorial can be found in ‘Broadway Remembers’ (a not-for-profit publication published to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by the Imperial War Museum. Proceeds to the Poppy Appeal).

 

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

© Debbie Williamson and Broadway Remembers, 2014. Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Debbie Williamson and Broadway Remembers with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remembered Today: Yeoman of Signals 22097 William George Crump Royal Navy

William George Crump, the eldest son of George Crump of Bromsgrove and Prudence Delsaux Fricker Crump  from Dunkerton, Somerset, was born in Laverton, Gloucestershire, on 9th December 1986.  William had four brothers and five sisters and by 1901 the family had moved to Tuck Mill, Broadway, where they ran a beerhouse and farmed the surrounding land.

After leaving school, aged 15, William joined the Royal Navy, and he served on destroyers and dreadnoughts and as a naval instructor at Plymouth, Devon, before the outbreak of the First World War. In 1912 he married Mary Edith Cotterell of Willersey Hill Farm, Willersey (now the Dormy House Hotel), and they had three children.

In June 1914, William was commissioned to HMS Marlborough which at the end of May 1916 was torpedoed in the Battle of Jutland. After the battle William was transferred to serve on HMS Revenge, the lead ship of the Revenge class of battleships which at the end of 1916 became the flagship of Admiral Charles E. Madden, second in command of the Grand Fleet.

William was taken ill in early 1919 and died of peritonitis at the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth, on 16th March 1919. His funeral took place with full naval honoursin the city and he is buried in Ford Park Cemetery (formerly known as Pennycomequick or Plymouth Old Cemetery).

His younger brother, Francis Laurent Delsaux Crump, who had been born in Broadway on 19th January 1897 enlisted with the Worcestershire Regiment shortly after the outbreak of the First World War. Francis served on the Western Front and was later commissioned as a Second Lieutenant attached to 21 Squadron Royal Flying Corps. Francis was killed during a practice flight on 18th October 1918 at Floringhem and he is buried in Lapugnoy Military Cemetery. Both William and Francis are commemorated on the City of Gloucester Cenotaph.

City of Gloucester Cenotaph © Broadway Remembers

City of Gloucester Cenotaph © Broadway Remembers

William is one of 48 commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial. Further information about William and his fellow men from Broadway commemorated on the memorial can be found in ‘Broadway Remembers’ (a not-for-profit publication published to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by the Imperial War Museum. Proceeds to the Poppy Appeal).

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

Remembered Today: Private 25249 Josiah J. Bayliss, Worcestershire Regiment transferred to 278004 Labour Corps

Headstone of Pte J.J. Bayliss, St Eadburgha's, Broadway, Worcestershire.

Headstone of Pte J.J. Bayliss, St Eadburgha’s, Broadway, Worcestershire.

Josiah James Bayliss, known as James, was born in 1882 at Pathlow near Wilmcote, Warwickshire, the third and youngest son of Josiah and Eliza Bayliss. James, a telegraph messenger, grew up in Mickleton, Gloucestershire, and in 1902 married Minnie Elizabeth Ann Mustoe in Stow-on-the-Wold. After their marriage, James and Minnie moved to Broadway.

Following the outbreak of the First World War, James joined the Worcestershire Regiment and was later transferred to the Labour Corps. Whilst stationed at Southern Command Labour Centre, Salisbury Plain, he contracted influenza and died of pneumonia, aged 36, on 2nd March 1919. His funeral took place at St Eadburgha’s Church, Snowshill Road, Broadway, on 8th March 1919 and he is buried in the churchyard.

Further information about James and the other men from Broadway who died in the First World War can be found in Broadway Remembers (ISBN 978-0-1-9929891-0-1) a not-for-profit publication raising money for the Poppy Appeal published to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by the Imperial War Museum.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

 

Remembered Today: Corporal 240841 Leonard Frank Green, 1/8th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment

Leonard Frank Green, known as Len, was born in Birmingham on 2nd September 1896, the second son of Harold and Mary Green. Len grew up in Sparkhill but by 1911 his father, a tailor, had opened an outfitters on the High Street, Broadway, and Len completed his education at Broadway Council School.

Len enlisted in September 1914 and joined the 1/8th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment. Len was posted to the Western Front at the beginning of April 1915. In April 1917 the battalion was involved in the Battle of Passchendaele and Len was killed in action, aged 20, on 27th August 1917. Len’s body was never recovered and he is commemorated on Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium. Len is also commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial and Broadway Council School Memorial Board.

Len is one of 48 commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial. Further information about Len and his fellow men from Broadway commemorated on the memorial can be found in ‘Broadway Remembers’ (a not-for-profit publication published to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by IWM. Proceeds to the Poppy Appeal).

Remembered Today: Pte 27819 Charles Hubert Keyte, 3rd Battalion Worcestershire Regiment

Charles Hubert Keyte was born in Broadway in 1891, the youngest son of Joseph and Emma Keyte. Charles was brought up in Broadway and attended Broadway Council School. After leaving school he set up a boot repairers in the village and married Lillian Slater from Milton under Wychwood, Oxfordshire in August 1913.

Charles attested under the Derby Scheme in 1915 and was called up in April 1916. He joined the 3rd Battalion Worcestershire Regiment and was posted to the Western Front. Four months later Charles was killed in action on 22nd August 1916 whilst serving in the front line trenches before the Leipzig Salient. He is buried in Authuile Military Cemetery and commemorated on the war memorial in Broadway and the Broadway Council School Memorial Board.

Charles is one of 48 commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial. Further information about Charles and his fellow men from Broadway commemorated on the memorial can be found in ‘Broadway Remembers’ (a not-for-profit publication published to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by IWM. Proceeds to the Poppy Appeal).