Broadway Soldier, Pte Joseph L. Badger, declared missing during the Action at Bourlon Wood on 24th November 1917

Broadway Remembers: Corporal 30883 Joseph Lawrence Badger, MM (1896-1983)
14th Service Battalion Machine Gun Corps
formerly 3rd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

During the First World War, 98 year ago today, 24th November 1917, Broadway soldier, Pte Joseph Lawrence Badger, who was serving with the Machine Gun Corps, was declared as missing in action during the action at Bourlon Wood during the Battle of Cambrai. Joseph was found in the snow and the mud the following day with gunshot wounds to his left knee and elbow and transported back to England where he was treated at the Kitchener Hospital, Brighton, and the Seaside Hospital, Sleaford, before re-joining the corps at Alnwick in early 1918.

Pte Badger was shot four times during the First World War. He enlisted, aged 18, with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in Stratford-upon-Avon on 4th December 1914. He was posted to the Western Front with the British Expeditionary Force on 2nd May 1915. Just over two weeks later on 19th May 1915 he received a gunshot wound to the head at Ypres. After a period of treatment and recuperation Pte Badger returned to his regiment and was posted to Gallipoli with the 9th (Service) Battalion at the beginning of September 1915. Within a few weeks, on 13th October 1915, Pte Badger received a gunshot wound to the left thigh at Suvla.

Pte Badger transferred to the Machine Gun Corps in May 1916 and trained at Belton Park near Grantham before being posted back to the Western Front the following month. Whilst back at the Front, in April 1917 Pte Badger was treated for trench fever and then on 24th November 1917, he was declared missing whilst at Bourlon Wood. After Pte Badger recovered from his gunshot wounds he again returned to the Corps and France where he was promoted to the rank of Corporal on 9th November 1918, two days before the Armistice.

Corporal Badger returned to England in February 1919 and he was demobilized the following month. He returned to Broadway the was awarded the Military Medal (London Gazette 17th June 1919). Joseph married Elizabeth Dunn the same year and died, aged 86, in Broadway in 1983.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers (ISBN: 978-0-9929891-0-1) proceeds to the Poppy Appeal
A not-for-profit publication to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by IWM

 

 

 

 

 

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WW1 Commemorations in Badsey, 6th – 14th September 2014

The Badsey Society are looking for First World War stories about the men and women from Badsey, Worcestershire. Articles, including photos and any other memorabilia, not exceeding 1,000 words, are requested to be submitted to Maureen Spinks (maureen.spinks-@-btopenworld.com) and will be included in the Festival of Churches exhibition to be held in September and then subsequently deposited in the Badsey Society Archive.

John Sydney Cull, known as Jack, who is commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial, was born in Badsey on 2nd November 1890 and was baptised at St James Church, Badsey on 25th January 1891. Jack was the third son of John and Ruth Cull who had married in Dudley in 1881. Jack enlisted with the Worcestershire Yeomanry (Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars) and shortly after he married Maud Richardson in Broadway in 1916 and he transferred to the Machine Gun Corps.

Jack served with the Mesopotamia Expeditionary Force and whilst in Mesopotamia died of influenza on 23rd October 1918, a month before the war in Mesopotamia ended. Jack was buried in Bijar Cemetery, Iran, and is commemorated on the Tehran Memorial. He is also commemorated on the stone memorial plaque inside St James Church.

Jack’s younger brother Edgar Cull served with the 1/8th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment. Edgar was wounded in the head at Festubert on 24th June 1915. He later returned to France and in 1918 news was received that he had been taken prisoner and was imprisoned in Germany. Edgar was released from prison in early 1919 and he returned home to Badsey where he lived until his death in 1969.

Information about Jack and Edgar Cull extracted from ‘Broadway Remembers’ a not-for-profit publication published to coincide with the First World War Centenary led by IWM. All proceeds from the sale of Broadway Remembers will be donated to the Poppy Appeal. Broadway Remembers can be purchased from various outlets in Broadway or from Amazon. For further information please send an email to: warmem-@-broadwaymanor.co.uk.

Remembered Today: Pte 47558 John Sydney Cull, 15th Squadron Machine Gun Corps

John Sydney Cull, known as Jack, who is commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial was born in Badsey near Evesham, Worcestershire, on 2nd November 1890. Jack, the third son of Jack Ernest and Ruth Cull, was brought up in Badsey with his nine brothers and sisters and as a boy attended Badsey Infants School.

After leaving school Jack worked for his father in the family bakery at The Sumachs in the village. Following the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914 Jack tried to enlist but was rejected on medical grounds. He was finally accepted in October 1914 and he enlisted with the Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars. Jack subsequently trained as a gunner and was transferred to the 15th Squadron Machine Gun Corps following its formation in February 1916.  Shortly before he was posted with his squadron Jack married Maud Marion Richardson at the Parish Church of St Michaels’, Broadway on 5th February 1916 and the couple set up home in Broadway.

Jack served in Mesopotamia but died from influenza on 25th October 1918, a month before the war in Mesopotamia ended and he is commemorated on the Tehran Memorial, Iran (panel 5, column 1).  A memorial service was held for Jack at St James Church, Badsey, on 19th December 1918 and his name is engraved on his parents’ headstone in the churchyard.

Broadway Remembers Pte. Jack Cull, born 2nd November 1890, who died 95 years ago today on 25th October 1918.