Remembering: Cousins Ben and Fred Standring, Arthur and Iltyd Prichard who died in the First World War

Ben Strandring, Fred Standring, Arthur Iltyd Prichard, Edward Owen Prichard, BroadwayInside St Michael and All Angels’ Church, Church Street, Broadway, hanging on the wall to the right of the altar is a small brass plaque which reads: In Loving Memory OF BEN STANDRING, FRED STANDRING, ARTHUR ILTYD PRICHARD, AND OWEN PRICHARD, NEPHEWS OF CHARLES T. STANDRING SURGEON OF THIS PARISH. KILLED IN THE GREAT WAR.

As these men are not commemorated on the war memorial on the green in the village and were not resident in Broadway when they enlisted and served in the First World War, I did not include them in my book, Broadway Remembers. However, I feel that these men should not go unmentioned as they were close relatives of Broadway’s doctor, Charles Turner Standring who served the village for many years.

Dr Charles Turner Standring (1865-1924)

Charles Standring was born in Lewisham, Kent, in 1865, the sixth son of John and Elizabeth Emma Standring. Charles was educated at Blackheath School and King’s College London. He studied medicine and took the diploma of Licence of the Society of Apothecaries (LSA) in 1891. After serving as a house surgeon at Shrewsbury Hospital and as a doctor’s assistant in various parts of the country, Charles, his wife, Caroline Matilda (nee Clayton), and daughter settled in Broadway.

Charles was an active member of the community and was known as the ‘sporting doctor’: he founded Broadway Golf Club and was Honorary Secretary of the Club for 26 years. Broadway Golf Club was initially sited where Broadway Cricket Club is today on Snowshill Road before Charles initiated its relocation. The Club eventually settled on its current site in 1911 at the top of the hill above Broadway. Charles was also an active member of Broadway Tennis Club and Cricket Club and also founded Broadway Football Club. He lived with his family at The Laurels (now Broome House), Church Street, Broadway, where Charles practised until his death on 8th November 1924, aged 59.

Four of Charles’s nephews died in the First World War and are remember on the brass plaque in the church:

 

2nd Lieutenant Benjamin Arthur (Ben) Standring, 2nd The Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1886-1914)

Ben Standring was born in 1886 in Oporto, Portugal, the only son of wine merchant Arthur Hamilton (Charles’s oldest brother) and Ellen Standring. He was educated at the Oporto British School and Charterhouse (Bodeites) in Surrey (from 1900 to 1904). Ben initially enlisted in 1909 with the 28th London Regiment (Artists’ Rifles) becoming a Corporal and then a Sergeant. Following the outbreak of the war, Ben proceeded to join the Expeditionary Force in France on 26th October 1914. At the time of his enlistment his parents were living at Heath Bank, Blackheath Rise, Lewisham in Kent.

Shortly after the Artists’ Rifles arrived in France they became an Officers’ Training Corps and in November 1914, Ben received his commission in The Royal Warwickshire Regiment which he joined at the front. He was wounded in action at Rouges Banes on 19th December 1914 and died the same day.

Ben is buried in Sailly-Sur-La-Lys churchyard in the Pas du Calais, France and is commemorated on the 1914-1918 Roll of Honour in St Mary Magdalene Church, Chiswick, Middlesex (the church is now closed).

 

Lieutenant Frederick John (Fred) Standring, 8th Royal Scots attached 57 Machine Gun Corps (Infantry)(1897-1918)

Fred Standring was the youngest son of book publisher Walter John (Charles’s brother) and Jane (aka Jean) Hackney Standring. He was born in Willesden, Middlesex in 1897 and at the time of his enlistment his widowed mother was living at 4 Coates Place, Edinburgh. He was appointed 2nd Lieutenant with the Royal Scots on 29th November 1916 and later promoted to Lieutenant.

Fred was killed in action on 6th September 1918, aged 21. Fred is buried in Sun Quarry Cemetery, Cherisy in the Pas de Calais and is commemorated on the St John, Uxbridge Moor war memorial which is now located in St Andrew’s Church, Hillingdon Road, Uxbridge, Middlesex.

 

Private 3888 Arthur Iltyd Prichard, 1/15th London Regiment, Own Civil Service Rifles (1880-1916)

Eldest son of solicitor Illtyd Moline and Ellen Adelaide Prichard of 34 Blessington Road, Lee, Kent. Arthur was born in Lee on 22nd October 1880. His mother was the younger sister of Charles Standring. His brother was Lieutenant Edward Owen (see below). Arthur was educated at Felsted School, Essex, where he was a Classical Scholar where he obtained a Mathematics Scholarship to Queen’s College, Cambridge University. After leaving Cambridge in 1902 he entered the Civil Service and passed the Indian Civil Service exams before being appointed to His Majesty’s Office of Works in 1904 and later appointed Private Secretary to the First Commissioner of Works.

Arthur joined the Civil Service Rifles on 30th May 1915 and served with B Company of the 1/15th London Regiment (Prince of Wales’ Own Civil Service Rifles) with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders. In May 1916, the battalion were in the Zouave Valley near Souchez. The entry for the 21st May states:

At 2.00am ‘B’ Company counter-attacked the Germans, very heavy rifle and machine gun fire was opened by the enemy, supported by a strong artillery barrage. We got into, and secured Granby Street. Relieved midnight 22nd to 23rd. Casualties, 2 officers and 90 other ranks. 

Aged 35, Arthur was one of the men killed in action on 21st May 1916. According to De Ruvigny’s Roll of Honour he was serving as a Corporal at the time of his death and was buried 100 years from the German trenches at Vimy Ridge. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial in the Pas de Calais.

 

Lieutenant Edward Owen Prichard, 21st Australian Infantry (1885-1917)

Younger brother of Arthur Iltyd Prichard (above), Edward, known as Owen was born on 15th August 1885 in Lee. He was educated at Lindisfarne College and Felsted School. After leaving school he worked for the Cycle Trade Publishing Company and emigrated to Australia as a farmer. On 4th May 1915 enlisted in Melbourne, Victoria. At the time he was living at 824 Malvern Road, Armadale, Victoria, with Miss Moline, a family relative, and was employed as an orchard supervisor.

Owen had previously served as 2nd Lieutenant with the 3rd Queen Volunteer West Kent Regiment for 2 years. He enlisted with the Australian Imperial Force and was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant on 1st June 1915 and subsequently promoted to Lieutenant. After a period of training on 3rd July 1916, he embarked on HMAT (His Majesty’s Australian Transport) Ayrshire A33 from Melbourne. He arrived in Plymouth on 2nd September 1916 where he underwent further training before embarking for France and Flanders. On 16th October he marched to Re-enforcement Camp in Etaples and was posted to the 21st Battalion on 18th October. Owen was promoted to Lieutenant on 11th December and was killed in action, aged 33, at Grevilliers, Bapaume, on 13th March 1917 where he is buried in Grevilliers British Cemetery.

 

We will remember them.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

 

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (military records & births, marriages and death records)
Australian Service Records
De Ruvigny’s Roll of Honour
FindMyPast
The British Medical Journal

 

 

 

 

 

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Broadway Men appear before Military Tribunals in Evesham

During the First World War, the passing of the Military Service Act in January 1916 enforced compulsory military service. As a result, single men and widowers without children aged 18-41 years were now liable to serve in the Army as long as they were not in a reserved occupation. The Act was extended in May of that year to cover both single and married men and in 1918 was extended to include men up to 51 years of age.

As a result of compulsory conscription, a series of Military Service Tribunals were established to hear applications and appeals for exemption from those with reasons not to serve in the Army. For men in Broadway, the Tribunals were held in Evesham.

The reasons for seeking exemption needed to fall in one of seven categories; employment or educational studies that were of greater national importance, domestic circumstances, conscientious objection and medical reasons.

William Joseph Keyte (1884-1974)

hommedia.ashxIn 1917, following compulsory conscription, William Joseph Keyte of Broadway, who was 33 years of age and working as a jobbing builder and decorator, finally passed his army medical with a Grade 3C. William had previously been rejected by the Army on three occasions.  He was now considered fit for service but only for clerical duties. Represented by Mr J.W. Roberts, William appealed his conscription on the basis that he would have to close his business if he enlisted as he had already lost one of his men to the war.

William appeared before Lieutenant Shelmerdine (who served with the RFC during WW1) at a Tribunal in Evesham. William stated during his appeal that there were a number of C3 single men in Broadway who did not have their own businesses who had not been called up and that he was married with three young children to support. William’s cousin, Harold Keyte, also a jobbing builder employed by many of the farms in Broadway, had passed Grade 1 fitness, however, he had received total exemption. William went on to explain that his cousin, Harold, would in spite of his employment be unable to support William’s family in his absence.

The Tribunal granted William full exemption from service during the war. His younger brother Charles Hubert Keyte, had served with the 3rd Battalion, Worcetershire Regiment, and was killed in action in France on 22nd August 1916 and is commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial.

William Stephens (b. 1886)

Aged 31, William Stephens of New Cottages, Leamington Road, Broadway, had been granted exemption on November 29th 1916. At the time he was working as a rabbit catcher for Mr Jackson in Broadway. His certificate of exemption was reviewed in 1917 at the request of the local National Service Representative as he was known to be no longer engaged in the same occupation. At his Tribunal, William stated that he was still catching rabbits and that he could get plenty of work on the land in and around Broadway. William who was single had passed Grade 2 at his medical. William lost his appeal and his exemption from service was withdrawn.

It is not known where or with which regiment William served. William was the son of Thomas and Louisa Stephens of Buckland.

 

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Broadway History Society Meeting: The Worcesters in WW1

On Monday 12th December the Broadway History Society will be meeting at 7pm in Broadway Methodist Church Hall, High Street, Broadway. The speaker will be Dennis Plant with a talk on ‘The Worcestershire Regiment in World War One’. Non-members welcome (£3).

Several men from Broadway served with the Worcesters during the First World War: see blog post https://broadwayhistorysociety.wordpress.com/2016/11/15/worcestershire-regiment/ for further details.

 

 

 

Broadway Library Commemorates the Battle of the Somme

Broadway Library Commemorates the Battle of the Somme

As part of the Worcestershire World War One Hundred programme The Somme Project is a countywide initiative for Worcestershire libraries to commemorate the centenary of the Battle of the Somme. Lasting 141 days, from 1st July to the 18th November 1916, the Battle of the Somme affected most local families, not only in Worcestershire, but across the country.

Broadway Library, Leamington Road, Broadway, has prepared a display honouring Private 27819 Charles Hubert Keyte of the 3rd battalion Worcestershire Regiment. Charles Keyte was born in Broadway in 1891 and attended Broadway Council School before starting his own boot making and repairing business which eventually moved to The Busy Bee on the High Street. Charles married Lillian Slater in 1913 and they had two sons, Philip and Charles.

Charles voluntarily attested in 1915 under the Derby Scheme and was posted to the Western Front in April 1916. Charles served in the Battle of the Somme and was killed in action on 22nd August 1916. Charles is buried in Authuile Military Cemetery, France, and is commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial and Broadway Council School Memorial Board.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

 

 

Remembered Today: Private Reginald B. Hill 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Remembered Today: Private Reginald Bertram Hill, 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action on the Western Front on 4th July 1915. Reginald, who was born in Broadway in 1894 and grew up at Bury End on the outskirts of the village. Reginald, an apprenticed as a baker after leaving Broadway Council School and enlisted with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in December 1914. Reginald is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium, and is commemorated on the war memorial in Broadway.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

New Memorial to the Worcestershire Yeomanry – Trooper Frank Folkes

On 23rd April a new memorial to the Worcestershire Yeomanry, commemorating the Centenary of the Battles of Qatia and Oghratina, was unveiled in Cripplegate Park, Worcester. The new memorial was created by sculptor and mosaic artist Victoria Harrison.

The Battles of Qatia and Oghratina saw the loss of 9 officers and 101 other ranks including Trooper 2414 Francis ‘Frank’ Folkes of Broadway who was killed in action at Qatia on 23rd April 1916. Born in Broadway in 1889, Frank worked as a butcher’s apprentice before joining the Worcestershire Yeomanry following the outbreak of the First World War. Frank was initially declared as missing in action after the battle at Qatia east of the Suez Canal, on Easter Sunday 1916 and 9 months later was declared as killed in action that day.

Frank Folkes is commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial, the memorial board in Broadway First School where he was a pupil and on the Jerusalem Memorial. Fellow villager Sidney Halford served with Frank and was taken prisoner at Qatia. Sidney returned home to Broadway at the end of the war following his release from prison.

For more information about the memorial and the Worcestershire Yeomanry visit www.ww1worcestershire.co.uk. ‘Broadway Remembers’ ISBN 978-0-9929881-0-1 includes a biography and photo of Frank Folkes (1889-1916).

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remembered Today: Captain Archibald Robert Hewitt DSO

Second son of Archibald Robert Hewitt, 6th Viscount and Viscountess Lifford, of Austin House, Broadway and Hill House, Lyndhurst, Hampshire, Captain Archibald Hewitt DSO was killed in action, aged 32, on 25th April 1915.

Archibald served with the 1st Battalion East Surrey Regiment. He received his commission in 1902 and became lieutenant in 1904 and captain in 1910 and adjutant the following year. He was awarded the DSO in August 1914 at Le Cateau during the retreat of Mons for “moving out of the trenches during heavy shell fire, and bringing back men who were dribbling to the rear.” He was reported as wounded on 17th September but soon after returned to the firing line and was twice mentioned in despatches in October and November 2014.

Archibald is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial (panel 34).

Austin House, Broadway, Worcestershire

Austin House, Broadway, Worcestershire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers