Remembered Today: Private 29004 Walter J. Tebby, 14th Battalion The Welsh Regiment

Private Walter John Tebby, son of Thomas and Mary Tebby of Broadway Wood Cottage, West End, Broadway, died aged 20 on 23rd July 1916 of wounds received in France.

Walter was born in Syresham, Northamptonshire, where he spent most of his childhood. By 1911, the family had moved to Broadway and Walter was emplyed as a cowman at Kite’s Nest Dairy. Walter served with the 14th Battalion The Welsh Regiment (originally the ‘Swansea Pals’) during the First World War and he was wounded in the head in the Battle of Mametz Wood on the Western Front in July 1916, and transferred home for treatment at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Netley, near Southampton, where he succumbed to his wounds. Walter is buried in St Eadburgha’s Churchyard, Snowshill Road, Broadway, and is commemorated  on the Broadway War Memorial and on a new Memorial Stone in Syresham which marks the centenary of the start of the First World War.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

Further information about the men from Broadway commemorated on the war memorial on the village green can be found in Broadway Remembers (ISBN: 9780992989101) a not-for-profit publication published to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by the Imperial War Museum. Proceeds to the Poppy Appeal.

Walter Tebby is also included in the publication The Lost Men of Syresham an account of the service lives and deaths of the soldiers from the village who fought and died in the Great War 1914-1918 by Bruce Smith and Ian Draper. To obtain a copy contact Syresham and District History Society (www.syresham1914.co.uk).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Remembered Today: Lance Corporal 17261 Dennis William Diston, 10th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment

Dennis William Diston, born in Stanton, Gloucestershire, in 1887 was the only son of Charles Diston from Cutsdean, Worcestershire, and Julia Ann Diston. The family moved to nearby Snowshill where Dennis found work as a jobbing gardener after leaving school. Dennis’s mother died in 1891, a year after his younger sister, Mabel, was born and his father remarried Phebe Hannah Bateman in October the following year. Dennis had three older sisters; Mary Ann (1878-1953), Elizabeth (1880-1883) and Dora Lavinia (1885-1915).

On 6th July 1912, Dennis married Mabel Elizabeth Grove in Broadway and they moved to Broadway where their two children (a son and a daughter) were born. Shortly after the outbreak of the First World War, Dennis enlisted with the 10th (Service) Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment and he was posted to the Western Front on 9th August 1915.

The following year Dennis was initially posted as missing in action and was later confirmed as killed in action, aged 29, on 22nd July 1916. Dennis is buried in Pozieres British Cemetery, Ovillers La-Boiselle, and is commemorated on the Snowshill War Memorial, Prestbury War Memorial and inside St Mary’s Church, Prestbury. His epitaph on his headstone reads: IN THAT SWEET BYE AND BYE WE SHALL MEET ON THAT BEAUTIFUL SHORE.

Pozieres British Cemetery (Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Pozieres British Cemetery (Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

As a resident of Broadway at the time of his death, Dennis was considered by the Broadway War Memorial Committee for inclusion on the war memorial built on the village green in 1919. The Committee, however, decided against including his name and Dennis was later commemorated on the Snowshill War Memorial, a stone cross, designed by Frederick Landseer Griggs, located in St Barnabas churchyard in the centre of the village.

Further information about the men from Broadway who died in the First World War can be found in Broadway Remembers (ISBN 978-0-1-9929891-0-1) a not-for-profit publication raising money for the Poppy Appeal published to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by the Imperial War Museum.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

 

Pte Wilford Figgitt writes home from the Western Front, July 1915

Wilford Figgitt of Broadway, who served with the 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment on the Western Front from May 1915, regularly wrote letters home with news from the trenches. In July 1915 he wrote:

We have had a pretty rough time during the last week and that a few men; sixty out of one company were killed or wounded. Last Wednesday I had a job carrying rations up to the Royal Scots in the middle of an attack, and shall not forget it in a hurry. The shells fell like hail and the bullets whistled like hell. The sights I shall never forget, for there were piles of dead and wounded to walk over, some with their heads blown off. We had a bit of amusement on Saturday. Our artillery and French started shelling the German trenches and you could see nothing but smoke and sandbags flying up in the air. It just pleased the Canadians, and they started throwing ladders over the top of their trenches to make believe they were going to attack, and as soon as the Germans showed their heads over theirs they opened on them with machine guns and yelled themselves hoarse. The time before when we got in their trenches we found a German boy, not more than thirteen years old, red-haired and wearing big jack-boots. He had probably been sent to throw bombs at us and got shot. I could tell you heaps more, but haven’t any paper to write on.

Pte Wilford Figgitt, son of Wilford John and Tryphena Figgitt, of Church Street, Broadway, was killed in action, aged 23, on 25th September 1915. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, and the Broadway War Memorial on the green in the village where he grew up.   Debbie Williamson Broadway Remembers

Remembered Today: Private 37889 Arthur H. Goddard, 1/5th Battalion Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry

Arthur Harold Goddard, known as Harold, was born in Cow Honeybourne, Worcestershire, in 1899. Harold’s father, George, worked as a farm labourer and the family moved from village to village as George moved from farm to farm in search of work. By 1911, the family had settled in Broadway and Harold found work as a labourer in the employ of Mr H. Roberts at nearby Buckland.

Aged 18, Harold enlisted in Worcester in August 1917 and he joined the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry. Harold was posted to the Western Front on 3rd April 1918 joining his battalion just before they took part in the Battle of Estaires. From the 12th April 1918 the battalion was involved in the Battle of Hazebrouck which lasted four days and it was on the first day of the battle that Harold was reported as missing in action. It was later reported by letter to his parents that Harold had been killed in action on either 12th or 14th April and that he had been buried between Estaires and Le Grand Pacault. It was later confirmed that Harold had been killed in action on the 14th and Harold is commemorated on Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium, which is about 15 miles away from where he was originally reported to have been buried.

Harold’s older brother, Frederick, served with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Frederick served with the 1st Battalion and was posted to the Western Front from where he wrote frequent letters home from ‘somewhere in France’ recounting his experiences of being in the trenches including surviving a gas attack on 24th May 1915. Frederick was wounded in the shin by an explosive bullet whilst on listening patrol on the Western Front on 31st October 1915. After months of hospital treatment, Frederick eventually lost his leg and he was honourably discharged with the Silver War Badge on 16th December 1916. Frederick re-enlisted with the Army Pay Corps in September 1918 and served in Nottingham until he was transferred to the Army Reserve on 9th March 1919.

Harold is one of 48 commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial. Further information about Harold, Frederick and their fellow men from Broadway commemorated on the memorial can be found in ‘Broadway Remembers’ (a not-for-profit publication published to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by the Imperial War Museum. Proceeds to the Poppy Appeal).

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

 

 

Remembered Today: Lance Corporal 30871 Edmund J. Wale, 8th Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment

Edmund Joseph Wale was born in Carrickfergus, Ireland, in 1885, the middle son of Joseph and Mary Wale from Margate, Kent. Edmund’s father worked for HM Coastguard and Edmund and his two brothers were brought up on the Kent coast.

After leaving school Edmund worked as a gardener and moved to London where he worked was employed by the landscape painter and garden designer Alfred Parsons RA1 in Kensington. Alfred Parsons was a member of the Broadway Colony2 of artists who lived and worked in London and Broadway in the late 1890s. Many of the colony were expatriate Americans and after Edmund’s marriage to Millicent Smedley in London in 1910, the couple moved to Russell House Cottage, Broadway, Worcestershire, where Edmund was employed by the American artist Francis Davis ‘Frank’ Millet and his wife Lily to tend the 14 acre gardens at Russell House.

page115aEdmund was supposed to accompany Frank Millet on RMS Titanic to New York on 10th April 1912 but did not travel due to the birth of his son, Brian, who had been born in Broadway in 1912. Frank Millet died in the sinking of the Titanic on 15th April 1912, and Edmund remained in the employ of Frank’s widow, Lily, until his conscription in August 1916.

After receiving his conscription papers in early 1916, Lily Millet twice appealed against conscription at meetings of the Evesham Military Service Tribunal but after being granted exemption until 31st July 1916, Edmund enlisted in Evesham with the Royal Berkshire Regiment.

Edmund served on the Western Front and during the 4th April 1918, during the Defence of Amiens, Edmund was killed in action. His body was never recovered from the battle site and he is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial. Edmund is also recorded in the Roll of Honour 2914-1918 in St Michael and All Angels’ Church, Broadway. His name was added to the west panel of the Cheltenham War Memorial in 1921 (his wife, Millicent and son had moved to Cheltenham from Broadway following his conscription).

Edmund is one of 48 commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial. Further information about Edmund and his fellow men from Broadway commemorated on the memorial can be found in ‘Broadway Remembers’ (a not-for-profit publication published to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by the Imperial War Museum. Proceeds to the Poppy Appeal).

 

1. Alfred Parsons RA was a Broadway Parish Councillor and Chairman of the Broadway War Memorial Committee from May 1919 until his death in January 1920.
2. The Broadway Colony of artists was a group of predominately American artists, writers, actors and musicians who made Broadway their home in the late 1880s and included Francis Davis Millet, Edmund Gosse, Mary Anderson de Navarro, John Singer Sargent, Alma de Tadema and Edwin Austin Abbey.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

Broadway Soldier, Pte Joseph L. Badger, declared missing during the Action at Bourlon Wood on 24th November 1917

Broadway Remembers: Corporal 30883 Joseph Lawrence Badger, MM (1896-1983)
14th Service Battalion Machine Gun Corps
formerly 3rd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

During the First World War, 98 year ago today, 24th November 1917, Broadway soldier, Pte Joseph Lawrence Badger, who was serving with the Machine Gun Corps, was declared as missing in action during the action at Bourlon Wood during the Battle of Cambrai. Joseph was found in the snow and the mud the following day with gunshot wounds to his left knee and elbow and transported back to England where he was treated at the Kitchener Hospital, Brighton, and the Seaside Hospital, Sleaford, before re-joining the corps at Alnwick in early 1918.

Pte Badger was shot four times during the First World War. He enlisted, aged 18, with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in Stratford-upon-Avon on 4th December 1914. He was posted to the Western Front with the British Expeditionary Force on 2nd May 1915. Just over two weeks later on 19th May 1915 he received a gunshot wound to the head at Ypres. After a period of treatment and recuperation Pte Badger returned to his regiment and was posted to Gallipoli with the 9th (Service) Battalion at the beginning of September 1915. Within a few weeks, on 13th October 1915, Pte Badger received a gunshot wound to the left thigh at Suvla.

Pte Badger transferred to the Machine Gun Corps in May 1916 and trained at Belton Park near Grantham before being posted back to the Western Front the following month. Whilst back at the Front, in April 1917 Pte Badger was treated for trench fever and then on 24th November 1917, he was declared missing whilst at Bourlon Wood. After Pte Badger recovered from his gunshot wounds he again returned to the Corps and France where he was promoted to the rank of Corporal on 9th November 1918, two days before the Armistice.

Corporal Badger returned to England in February 1919 and he was demobilized the following month. He returned to Broadway the was awarded the Military Medal (London Gazette 17th June 1919). Joseph married Elizabeth Dunn the same year and died, aged 86, in Broadway in 1983.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers (ISBN: 978-0-9929891-0-1) proceeds to the Poppy Appeal
A not-for-profit publication to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by IWM

 

 

 

 

 

Remembered Today: Pte 27819 Charles Hubert Keyte, 3rd Battalion Worcestershire Regiment

Charles Hubert Keyte was born in Broadway in 1891, the youngest son of Joseph and Emma Keyte. Charles was brought up in Broadway and attended Broadway Council School. After leaving school he set up a boot repairers in the village and married Lillian Slater from Milton under Wychwood, Oxfordshire in August 1913.

Charles attested under the Derby Scheme in 1915 and was called up in April 1916. He joined the 3rd Battalion Worcestershire Regiment and was posted to the Western Front. Four months later Charles was killed in action on 22nd August 1916 whilst serving in the front line trenches before the Leipzig Salient. He is buried in Authuile Military Cemetery and commemorated on the war memorial in Broadway and the Broadway Council School Memorial Board.

Charles is one of 48 commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial. Further information about Charles and his fellow men from Broadway commemorated on the memorial can be found in ‘Broadway Remembers’ (a not-for-profit publication published to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by IWM. Proceeds to the Poppy Appeal).