Remembering: Cousins Ben and Fred Standring, Arthur and Iltyd Prichard who died in the First World War

Ben Strandring, Fred Standring, Arthur Iltyd Prichard, Edward Owen Prichard, BroadwayInside St Michael and All Angels’ Church, Church Street, Broadway, hanging on the wall to the right of the altar is a small brass plaque which reads: In Loving Memory OF BEN STANDRING, FRED STANDRING, ARTHUR ILTYD PRICHARD, AND OWEN PRICHARD, NEPHEWS OF CHARLES T. STANDRING SURGEON OF THIS PARISH. KILLED IN THE GREAT WAR.

As these men are not commemorated on the war memorial on the green in the village and were not resident in Broadway when they enlisted and served in the First World War, I did not include them in my book, Broadway Remembers. However, I feel that these men should not go unmentioned as they were close relatives of Broadway’s doctor, Charles Turner Standring who served the village for many years.

Dr Charles Turner Standring (1865-1924)

Charles Standring was born in Lewisham, Kent, in 1865, the sixth son of John and Elizabeth Emma Standring. Charles was educated at Blackheath School and King’s College London. He studied medicine and took the diploma of Licence of the Society of Apothecaries (LSA) in 1891. After serving as a house surgeon at Shrewsbury Hospital and as a doctor’s assistant in various parts of the country, Charles, his wife, Caroline Matilda (nee Clayton), and daughter settled in Broadway.

Charles was an active member of the community and was known as the ‘sporting doctor’: he founded Broadway Golf Club and was Honorary Secretary of the Club for 26 years. Broadway Golf Club was initially sited where Broadway Cricket Club is today on Snowshill Road before Charles initiated its relocation. The Club eventually settled on its current site in 1911 at the top of the hill above Broadway. Charles was also an active member of Broadway Tennis Club and Cricket Club and also founded Broadway Football Club. He lived with his family at The Laurels (now Broome House), Church Street, Broadway, where Charles practised until his death on 8th November 1924, aged 59.

Four of Charles’s nephews died in the First World War and are remember on the brass plaque in the church:

 

2nd Lieutenant Benjamin Arthur (Ben) Standring, 2nd The Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1886-1914)

Ben Standring was born in 1886 in Oporto, Portugal, the only son of wine merchant Arthur Hamilton (Charles’s oldest brother) and Ellen Standring. He was educated at the Oporto British School and Charterhouse (Bodeites) in Surrey (from 1900 to 1904). Ben initially enlisted in 1909 with the 28th London Regiment (Artists’ Rifles) becoming a Corporal and then a Sergeant. Following the outbreak of the war, Ben proceeded to join the Expeditionary Force in France on 26th October 1914. At the time of his enlistment his parents were living at Heath Bank, Blackheath Rise, Lewisham in Kent.

Shortly after the Artists’ Rifles arrived in France they became an Officers’ Training Corps and in November 1914, Ben received his commission in The Royal Warwickshire Regiment which he joined at the front. He was wounded in action at Rouges Banes on 19th December 1914 and died the same day.

Ben is buried in Sailly-Sur-La-Lys churchyard in the Pas du Calais, France and is commemorated on the 1914-1918 Roll of Honour in St Mary Magdalene Church, Chiswick, Middlesex (the church is now closed).

 

Lieutenant Frederick John (Fred) Standring, 8th Royal Scots attached 57 Machine Gun Corps (Infantry)(1897-1918)

Fred Standring was the youngest son of book publisher Walter John (Charles’s brother) and Jane (aka Jean) Hackney Standring. He was born in Willesden, Middlesex in 1897 and at the time of his enlistment his widowed mother was living at 4 Coates Place, Edinburgh. He was appointed 2nd Lieutenant with the Royal Scots on 29th November 1916 and later promoted to Lieutenant.

Fred was killed in action on 6th September 1918, aged 21. Fred is buried in Sun Quarry Cemetery, Cherisy in the Pas de Calais and is commemorated on the St John, Uxbridge Moor war memorial which is now located in St Andrew’s Church, Hillingdon Road, Uxbridge, Middlesex.

 

Private 3888 Arthur Iltyd Prichard, 1/15th London Regiment, Own Civil Service Rifles (1880-1916)

Eldest son of solicitor Illtyd Moline and Ellen Adelaide Prichard of 34 Blessington Road, Lee, Kent. Arthur was born in Lee on 22nd October 1880. His mother was the younger sister of Charles Standring. His brother was Lieutenant Edward Owen (see below). Arthur was educated at Felsted School, Essex, where he was a Classical Scholar where he obtained a Mathematics Scholarship to Queen’s College, Cambridge University. After leaving Cambridge in 1902 he entered the Civil Service and passed the Indian Civil Service exams before being appointed to His Majesty’s Office of Works in 1904 and later appointed Private Secretary to the First Commissioner of Works.

Arthur joined the Civil Service Rifles on 30th May 1915 and served with B Company of the 1/15th London Regiment (Prince of Wales’ Own Civil Service Rifles) with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders. In May 1916, the battalion were in the Zouave Valley near Souchez. The entry for the 21st May states:

At 2.00am ‘B’ Company counter-attacked the Germans, very heavy rifle and machine gun fire was opened by the enemy, supported by a strong artillery barrage. We got into, and secured Granby Street. Relieved midnight 22nd to 23rd. Casualties, 2 officers and 90 other ranks. 

Aged 35, Arthur was one of the men killed in action on 21st May 1916. According to De Ruvigny’s Roll of Honour he was serving as a Corporal at the time of his death and was buried 100 years from the German trenches at Vimy Ridge. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial in the Pas de Calais.

 

Lieutenant Edward Owen Prichard, 21st Australian Infantry (1885-1917)

Younger brother of Arthur Iltyd Prichard (above), Edward, known as Owen was born on 15th August 1885 in Lee. He was educated at Lindisfarne College and Felsted School. After leaving school he worked for the Cycle Trade Publishing Company and emigrated to Australia as a farmer. On 4th May 1915 enlisted in Melbourne, Victoria. At the time he was living at 824 Malvern Road, Armadale, Victoria, with Miss Moline, a family relative, and was employed as an orchard supervisor.

Owen had previously served as 2nd Lieutenant with the 3rd Queen Volunteer West Kent Regiment for 2 years. He enlisted with the Australian Imperial Force and was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant on 1st June 1915 and subsequently promoted to Lieutenant. After a period of training on 3rd July 1916, he embarked on HMAT (His Majesty’s Australian Transport) Ayrshire A33 from Melbourne. He arrived in Plymouth on 2nd September 1916 where he underwent further training before embarking for France and Flanders. On 16th October he marched to Re-enforcement Camp in Etaples and was posted to the 21st Battalion on 18th October. Owen was promoted to Lieutenant on 11th December and was killed in action, aged 33, at Grevilliers, Bapaume, on 13th March 1917 where he is buried in Grevilliers British Cemetery.

 

We will remember them.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

 

Sources:

Ancestry.co.uk (military records & births, marriages and death records)
Australian Service Records
De Ruvigny’s Roll of Honour
FindMyPast
The British Medical Journal

 

 

 

 

 

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Menin Gate, Ypres, Belgium

Last weekend I visited the Menin Gate in Ypres to attend the very moving daily Act of Remembrance at the Memorial. At 8pm every evening The Last Post, the traditional final salute to the fallen, is played by buglers in honour of the memory of the soldiers of the former British Empire and its allies who died in the Ypres Salient during the First World War. At around 7.30pm the traffic under the Gate was stopped and shortly afterwards members of the local Fire Brigade and Fire Brigade Buglers marched from the market square along Menenstraat to the Gate for the ceremony whilst members of the public gathered beneath the Memorial.

The Menin Gate designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield with sculpture by Sir William Reid-Dick, was unveiled by Lord Plumer on 24th July 1927. The Memorial bears the names of more than 54,000 officers and men whose graves are not known. Amongst those commemorated are the following men from Broadway:

Private George Barnett, 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment who was killed in action, aged 28, on 9th July 1915.

Private William Harold Gabb, 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards who was fatally wounded in action, aged 34, on 7th November 1914.

Captain Archibald Robert Hewitt DSO, 1st Battalion East Surrey Regiment who was killed in action, aged 32, on 25th April 1915.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers
August 2017

 

 

 

Remembered Today: Private Reginald B. Hill 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Remembered Today: Private Reginald Bertram Hill, 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action on the Western Front on 4th July 1915. Reginald, who was born in Broadway in 1894 and grew up at Bury End on the outskirts of the village. Reginald, an apprenticed as a baker after leaving Broadway Council School and enlisted with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in December 1914. Reginald is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium, and is commemorated on the war memorial in Broadway.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

Pte Wilford Figgitt writes home from the Western Front, July 1915

Wilford Figgitt of Broadway, who served with the 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment on the Western Front from May 1915, regularly wrote letters home with news from the trenches. In July 1915 he wrote:

We have had a pretty rough time during the last week and that a few men; sixty out of one company were killed or wounded. Last Wednesday I had a job carrying rations up to the Royal Scots in the middle of an attack, and shall not forget it in a hurry. The shells fell like hail and the bullets whistled like hell. The sights I shall never forget, for there were piles of dead and wounded to walk over, some with their heads blown off. We had a bit of amusement on Saturday. Our artillery and French started shelling the German trenches and you could see nothing but smoke and sandbags flying up in the air. It just pleased the Canadians, and they started throwing ladders over the top of their trenches to make believe they were going to attack, and as soon as the Germans showed their heads over theirs they opened on them with machine guns and yelled themselves hoarse. The time before when we got in their trenches we found a German boy, not more than thirteen years old, red-haired and wearing big jack-boots. He had probably been sent to throw bombs at us and got shot. I could tell you heaps more, but haven’t any paper to write on.

Pte Wilford Figgitt, son of Wilford John and Tryphena Figgitt, of Church Street, Broadway, was killed in action, aged 23, on 25th September 1915. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, and the Broadway War Memorial on the green in the village where he grew up.   Debbie Williamson Broadway Remembers

Broadway Remembers Gallipoli

The Gallipoli Campaign began 100 years ago today on 25th April 1915. This year, the hundreds of thousands of men from across the world who fought and died at Gallipoli a century ago are being remembered and we remember the following men of Broadway who died during the campaign, part of the Middle Eastern Theatre of the First World War. All of the following Broadway men are commemorated on the Helles Memorial on the tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula:

  • Private 19218 Richard K. Handy 9th Battalion Worcstershire Regiment, born in Broadway in 1883, who was killed in action, aged 32, on 4th November. Private Handy is also commemorated on the Evesham War Memorial.
  • Private 21387 Wilfred G. Scrivens 4th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment, born in Broadway in 1885, who was killed in action, on 6th August 1915 and is also commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial.
  • Private  19365 Walter E. Spiers 4th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment, born in Broadway in 1884, who died at sea, aged 31, on 31st August 1915. Private Spiers is also commemorated in St Peter’s Church, Inkberrow, Worcestershire.
  • Private 10754 Wilfred G. Tandy 9th (Service) Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, born in Broadway in 1885, who was killed, aged 30, by enemy fire whilst refilling his water bottle at a nullah on 7th August 1915. Private Tandy is also commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial.

 

Helles Memorial (Commonwealth War Graves Commission0

Helles Memorial (Commonwealth War Graves Commission

 

Further information about the men from Broadway commemorated on the war memorial on the village green can be found in ‘Broadway Remembers’ (a not-for-profit publication published to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by the Imperial War Museum. Proceeds to the Poppy Appeal).

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

© Debbie Williamson and Broadway Remembers, 2014. Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Debbie Williamson and Broadway Remembers with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

Remembered Today: Private 37889 Arthur H. Goddard, 1/5th Battalion Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry

Arthur Harold Goddard, known as Harold, was born in Cow Honeybourne, Worcestershire, in 1899. Harold’s father, George, worked as a farm labourer and the family moved from village to village as George moved from farm to farm in search of work. By 1911, the family had settled in Broadway and Harold found work as a labourer in the employ of Mr H. Roberts at nearby Buckland.

Aged 18, Harold enlisted in Worcester in August 1917 and he joined the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry. Harold was posted to the Western Front on 3rd April 1918 joining his battalion just before they took part in the Battle of Estaires. From the 12th April 1918 the battalion was involved in the Battle of Hazebrouck which lasted four days and it was on the first day of the battle that Harold was reported as missing in action. It was later reported by letter to his parents that Harold had been killed in action on either 12th or 14th April and that he had been buried between Estaires and Le Grand Pacault. It was later confirmed that Harold had been killed in action on the 14th and Harold is commemorated on Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium, which is about 15 miles away from where he was originally reported to have been buried.

Harold’s older brother, Frederick, served with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Frederick served with the 1st Battalion and was posted to the Western Front from where he wrote frequent letters home from ‘somewhere in France’ recounting his experiences of being in the trenches including surviving a gas attack on 24th May 1915. Frederick was wounded in the shin by an explosive bullet whilst on listening patrol on the Western Front on 31st October 1915. After months of hospital treatment, Frederick eventually lost his leg and he was honourably discharged with the Silver War Badge on 16th December 1916. Frederick re-enlisted with the Army Pay Corps in September 1918 and served in Nottingham until he was transferred to the Army Reserve on 9th March 1919.

Harold is one of 48 commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial. Further information about Harold, Frederick and their fellow men from Broadway commemorated on the memorial can be found in ‘Broadway Remembers’ (a not-for-profit publication published to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by the Imperial War Museum. Proceeds to the Poppy Appeal).

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers

 

 

 

Broadway Soldier, Pte Joseph L. Badger, declared missing during the Action at Bourlon Wood on 24th November 1917

Broadway Remembers: Corporal 30883 Joseph Lawrence Badger, MM (1896-1983)
14th Service Battalion Machine Gun Corps
formerly 3rd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

During the First World War, 98 year ago today, 24th November 1917, Broadway soldier, Pte Joseph Lawrence Badger, who was serving with the Machine Gun Corps, was declared as missing in action during the action at Bourlon Wood during the Battle of Cambrai. Joseph was found in the snow and the mud the following day with gunshot wounds to his left knee and elbow and transported back to England where he was treated at the Kitchener Hospital, Brighton, and the Seaside Hospital, Sleaford, before re-joining the corps at Alnwick in early 1918.

Pte Badger was shot four times during the First World War. He enlisted, aged 18, with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in Stratford-upon-Avon on 4th December 1914. He was posted to the Western Front with the British Expeditionary Force on 2nd May 1915. Just over two weeks later on 19th May 1915 he received a gunshot wound to the head at Ypres. After a period of treatment and recuperation Pte Badger returned to his regiment and was posted to Gallipoli with the 9th (Service) Battalion at the beginning of September 1915. Within a few weeks, on 13th October 1915, Pte Badger received a gunshot wound to the left thigh at Suvla.

Pte Badger transferred to the Machine Gun Corps in May 1916 and trained at Belton Park near Grantham before being posted back to the Western Front the following month. Whilst back at the Front, in April 1917 Pte Badger was treated for trench fever and then on 24th November 1917, he was declared missing whilst at Bourlon Wood. After Pte Badger recovered from his gunshot wounds he again returned to the Corps and France where he was promoted to the rank of Corporal on 9th November 1918, two days before the Armistice.

Corporal Badger returned to England in February 1919 and he was demobilized the following month. He returned to Broadway the was awarded the Military Medal (London Gazette 17th June 1919). Joseph married Elizabeth Dunn the same year and died, aged 86, in Broadway in 1983.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Remembers (ISBN: 978-0-9929891-0-1) proceeds to the Poppy Appeal
A not-for-profit publication to coincide with the global First World War Centenary commemorations led by IWM